What’s a Pasty?

The name sounds odd, doesn’t it?
Do you want to know how to pronounce it? It’s ‘pass’ as in football and ‘tee’ as in golf. The most important thing? They taste fantastic!

Describe the product for you?
A pasty is a savoury meat and/or vegetable pie that’s a complete meal in its own right. It’s designed to eat on the go while also being tremendously satisfying. There are a wide variety of fillings, hence the saying…”it’s all in the crust.”

What does it look like?
A pasty looks a lot like a Spanish empanada — but slightly more substantial.

How do will you know which pasty is which (for carry out or “to go”)?
In order to help you identify which pasty is which from the outside — and without cutting them open — we’ve placed a symbol on the crust of each one.

What are our suggestions for reheating?
Many people purchase our pasties to reheat later for the family dinner. Our crust and fillings respond well to these processes, as we’ve tested them all.

Reheating the already baked pasties —
• Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
• Lovingly place wonderful pasties on a baking sheet.
• Bake for 20-25 mins depending on the power of the oven.
• If you have a food thermometer, check that the inside exceeds 165 F.
• Serve with vegetables of your choice.

For those who have purchased the chilled pasties —
• Pre heat oven to 375 degrees.
• Lovingly place wonderful pasties on a baking sheet.
• Brush with egg wash. For egg wash simply beat an egg with a tablespoon of milk.
• Pierce top of pasty with a small slit.
• Bake for 30-35 mins depending on the power of the oven.
• The crust should be golden brown.
• If you have a food thermometer, check that the inside exceeds 165 F.
• Serve with vegetables of your choice.

What’s the history?
The pasty originates from the southwest of England, in Cornwall. It has a long and unique history going back centuries. Some say it’s the oldest food to go. One of the oldest references is that Jane Seymour (Henry VIII’s 3rd wife) had pasties made for Henry by one of her bakers. They are also mentioned in Shakespearean plays. Cornish folklore said that the devil would never dare enter Cornwall because the Cornish housewife was so adept at creating pasties with any filling, he feared she would put him into a pasty. Perhaps the pasty is best known as the traditional food of Cornish tin miners (dating back to the 16th to late 19th centuries). The pasty was easy to carry and provided a hearty, substantial meal to keep a hard-working miner going all day. When the tin in Cornwall was mined out, the miners emigrated all over the world and took their dish with them, including to parts of the United States.

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Welcome to Pure Pasty

Welcome to The Pure Pasty Company. We are the first bakery of its kind in Northern Virginia. If you're looking for a meal that's compact and full of aromatic, homemade goodness, then look no further! The taste of Britain is here. Dig in!

Testimonials

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Pasties are absolutely delicious! You catch that amazing smell as soon as you step in the shop. They remind me a bit of handheld pot pies.

J. Smithfield, Vienna VA.